Interesting Facts About Poverty

  • Interesting Facts About Poverty

     Graham Soper updated 3 months, 1 week ago 1 Member · 16 Posts
  • Graham Soper

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    6 April 2021 at 8:57 am
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    Read, learn and share interesting facts about poverty here. You’ll earn Credits for everything you do which will help add value to the donation set aside for your nominated cause as well as increasing the size of your own personal Wisdom Trust Grant Fund.

  • Graham Soper

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    6 April 2021 at 9:43 am
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    The good news is that between 1990 and 2017, the number of people living in extreme poverty (with less than $2 per day) fell from 1.9 billion (35.7%) to 689 million (9.1%). the bad news is that the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic could see an additional 150 million people fall into extreme poverty.

  • Graham Soper

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    6 April 2021 at 9:46 am
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    If we maintain the recent rate of progress, poverty should be eradicated sometime between 2025 and 2030. That’s good news. But the COVID-19 pandemic could still derail this target. So we must continue the hard work as 17,500 children are still dying every day as a direct result of poverty.

  • Graham Soper

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    8 April 2021 at 2:43 pm
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    Poor health outcomes in the developing world can be improved.

    Diarrhoea and pneumonia together kills more kids than AIDS, Malaria and TB combined. Most of these deaths are in countries with a high rate of poverty but diarrhoea and pneumonia are 100% preventable, treatable diseases that no one should die from.

    • This reply was modified 3 months, 3 weeks ago by  Graham Soper.
  • Graham Soper

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    8 April 2021 at 2:45 pm
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    Educating Women Can Save More Young Lives.

    A child born to a mother who can read is 50% more likely to survive past the age of 5. Therefore it should be a priority to ensure more women in the developing world get a good standard of education.

  • Graham Soper

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    13 April 2021 at 1:00 pm
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    Nearly a billion people entered the 21st century unable to read a book or sign their names – that’s about 14% of the global population at the time. And only slight improvements in global literacy levels have been made in the twenty or more years since then.

    • This reply was modified 3 months, 1 week ago by  Graham Soper.
    • This reply was modified 3 months ago by  Graham Soper.
  • Graham Soper

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    14 April 2021 at 10:30 am
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    About $40billion is the sum required each year to ensure that basic education, nutrition, healthcare, water and sanitation is available to all. That’s less than the sum currently spent annually in the USA and Europe combined on cosmetics, perfume and ice cream.

  • Graham Soper

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    15 April 2021 at 4:13 pm
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    Access to piped water into the household averages about 85% for the wealthiest 20% of the world’s population, compared with 25% for the poorest 20%.

  • Graham Soper

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    15 April 2021 at 4:17 pm
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    An increasing proportion of child deaths – and four out of every five deaths of children under five – are in South Asia and sub-Saharan Africa.

  • Graham Soper

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    16 April 2021 at 2:48 pm
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    Infectious diseases continue to blight the lives of the poor and those living in poverty across the world. An estimated 38 million people are living with HIV/AIDS (including about 1.8 million children). There were 690,000 deaths in 2019 and 1.7 million newly infected people that year.

    Sub-Saharan Africa, with more than two-thirds of all people living with HIV globally, is the hardest hit region in the world, followed by Asia and the Pacific.

    In 2019, there were 229 million cases of malaria, with 409,000 fatalities: Africa accounts for 90% of malarial deaths and African children account for over 80% of malaria victims worldwide.

  • Graham Soper

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    20 April 2021 at 1:53 pm
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    Africa uses less than 3% of the world’s energy, despite having 12.5% of the world’s population.

  • Graham Soper

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    20 April 2021 at 1:53 pm
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    Poor people in developing countries spend 60-80% of their income on food whereas Americans spend less than 10%.

  • Graham Soper

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    20 April 2021 at 1:54 pm
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    8 out of 10 people in sub-Saharan Africa heat their home and cook food using open fires, which is extremely bad for your health.

  • Graham Soper

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    23 April 2021 at 7:19 am
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    There is more than enough food produced in the world to feed everyone on the planet, and yet over half a billion people still go to bed hungry each night

  • Graham Soper

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    23 April 2021 at 7:19 am
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    TB is a disease that is both preventable and, in most cases, treatable, and yet a million children, mostly from poor communities without adequate healthcare, suffer with it every year and one child dies from it every 2 minutes.

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